Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Where is the Crosstown Parkway Project?

The project is in Port St. Lucie, Florida and extends Crosstown Parkway along the existing West Virginia Drive, crossing over the North Fork of the St. Lucie River and connecting into U.S. 1 at Village Green Drive, a distance of approximately two miles with the bridge being approximately 4,000 feet.

What are the features of the project?

The bridge will feature dedicated bicycle lanes, pedestrian walkways and significant landscaping.

What are the benefits of the project?

The new bridge will provide an alternate route connecting major east and west corridors within the City. The new roadway will reduce travel times and emergency response times, while providing residents with an easy and safe alternate route to travel between U.S. 1 and I-95. The new road will help improve traffic patterns and mobility as well as relieve congestion along Port St. Lucie Boulevard and Prima Vista Boulevard. Project features include:

  • Dedicated bicycle lanes in each direction
  • Superstreet (stretched out, signalized roundabout) at the intersection of Crosstown and Floresta
  • Raised landscaped median
  • Green space with a wide pedestrian pathway on both sides, west of Floresta Drive, a linear park
  • Aesthetically-pleasing bridge overlooks
  • Pedestrian and highway lighting
  • Architectural treatments
  • Landscaping
  • Drainage
  • American with Disability (ADA) Compliant Canoe/ Kayak Launch
  • Exercise stations

How much does the project cost and how is the project being funded?

Estimated construction costs:  $87.6 million
Funding:  Combined Federal, State and Local funding

What is the construction schedule for the project?

Construction activities started in early January 2017 with an anticipated completion Fall 2019.

What will be the minimum vertical clearance of the bridge?

The United States Coast Guard determined the clearance for the new bridge must meet or exceed the clearance of the existing Port St. Lucie Boulevard Bridge which is 18.6 feet vertical and 75.5 feet horizontal.

Who can I contact for questions or concerns about this project?

Beth Zsoka, Public Information Officer
Crosstown Parkway Extension
772-871-5176
Beth.Zsoka@QCAusa.com

or

Sarah Prohaska, City of Port St. Lucie Public Information Officer
772-873-6326
sprohaska@cityofpsl.com

What was the design of the Crosstown Parkway/Floresta Drive Intersection (the “Intersection”) in the EIS?

The intersection design for Alternative 1C analyzed in the EIS reflected a traditional 4-leg intersection with the following movements:

  • Crosstown Parkway – 3 eastbound (EB) and 3 westbound (WB) thru lanes, single EB left turn lane, double WB left turn lanes, and single WB and EB right turn lanes.
  • Floresta Drive – 2 northbound (NB) and 2 southbound (SB) thru lanes, single NB right turn lane, single NB left turn lane, single SB right turn lane, and double SB left turn lanes.

What was the design of the Intersection in the RFP Concept Plans/Design Criteria Package?

The intersection design in the RFP Concept Plans included a traditional 4-leg intersection with the following movements to reflect the discussion that Floresta Drive remain a 2-lane local collector in lieu of a 4-lane urban arterial:

  • Crosstown Parkway – 3 eastbound (EB) and 3 westbound (WB) thru lanes, single right and left turn lanes in both EB and WB directions.
  • Floresta Drive – 1 NB and 1 SB thru lane, single right and left turn lanes in both NB and SB directions.

When did ATC #13 occur?

ATC #13 was presented at ATC Meeting #2 on November 12, 2014. The Archer Western (AW)/RS&H Team formally submitted ATC #13 in writing on November 21, 2014. After thorough evaluation of ATC #13, the design-build review team recommended approval of this change. ATC #13 was formally approved on December 5, 2014.

How do the conditions at the Intersection differ from those at the California, Cashmere and Cameo intersections? What conditions at the Intersection are different enough from these other intersections to warrant being the first superstreet in Florida?

California, Cashmere, and Cameo serve as connectors to major activity areas and schools, while Floresta serves a primarily residential community. The team is currently researching the traffic volume counts.  We anticipate the projected traffic volumes along Crosstown Parkway will be significantly higher in the area of Floresta than near California, Cashmere, and Cameo, resulting in greater challenges to providing access to and from Floresta at the intersection. FHWA publication FHWA-HRT-09-059 (see attached) supports the use of superstreet intersections for this differential in traffic volumes between Crosstown Parkway and Floresta Drive.

Would it be “wrong” to build an intersection to Level E to see how the traffic patterns change on Floresta Drive, especially when it is not projected to reach LOS F until 2037?

As is standard practice, the only years analyzed were the opening year (2017) and the design year (2037). LOS F would most likely be reached prior to 2037. LOS E is not a desirable condition for the opening year from a design standpoint.

How does the cost of the proposed intersection compare to the cost of using a traditional PSL intersection design at this location?

The difference in construction cost is minimal between the RFP Concept Plans intersection and the superstreet intersection. The approved superstreet intersection was included in AW’s price proposal.

Was a true Michigan left with Floresta through-lanes considered?

Yes, during the proposal phase RS&H reviewed this alternative.  Their findings were, due to the high volumes of thru-traffic for Crosstown Parkway, the Michigan left intersection failed in traffic analysis and was therefore not presented.

Did staff see a cost and operations comparison between a standard design, Michigan left and superstreet for the Intersection? If so, please provide me with any corresponding summary.

RS&H provided a detailed operations comparison between the standard design and the superstreet (Michigan left was not presented). Upon the design-build team’s detailed review of this data, the team concurred with RS&H that the superstreet performed significantly better than the standard design intersection identified in the RFP, providing a better level of service for both Crosstown Parkway and Floresta Drive. The difference in construction cost is minimal between the RFP Concept Plans intersection and the superstreet intersection. The approved superstreet intersection was included in AW’s price proposal.

Compare and contrast the pedestrian movement, including timing, to that of a traditional PSL intersection design at this location.

The pedestrian movement is safer for the superstreet intersection in comparison to a traditional intersection design due to the large refuge island in the median as well as a reduction in conflict points from 32 to 14. Modeling of the pedestrian timing was not performed.

The material states that there will be 12% more green time for Crosstown drivers as a result of the superstreet. What is the impact for Floresta drivers?

The LOS E and F movements projected for Floresta drivers associated with the traditional intersection are all improved to acceptable levels with the superstreet. Operations are improved for Floresta drivers. The independent timing of the traffic signals both EB and WB on Crosstown Parkway provide more efficient traffic movement for Floresta Drivers.

How does the anticipated volume of Floresta Drive compare to the volumes of other “minor” streets where superstreet intersections have been constructed?

We do not have specific information regarding other superstreets in comparison to Floresta Drive. FHWA publication FHWA-HRT-09-059 (see attached) supports the use of superstreet intersections for the projected differential in traffic volumes between Crosstown Parkway and Floresta Drive.

Given that this would be the first such intersection in Florida, what is the proposed educational effort for our drivers?

Port St. Lucie’s residents and drivers will be educated on the superstreet prior to opening through public information. The intersection will have proper signage, signals, and pavement markings that will clearly show motorists how to maneuver through the intersection.  A video simulation and superstreet information will be provided on the City and project website.

How does the estimated cost of operating and maintaining the superstreet intersection compare to the cost of operating and maintaining a traditional PSL intersection design at this location?

Although there are two additional mast arms with the superstreet, there is less pavement than a traditional intersection. Therefore, the difference in operating and maintenance costs is insignificant.

Has the contractor constructed any superstreets previously?

No.